For extra credit I decided to revisit my beloved Inanna’s Descent into the Underworld that I based my Storybook project on. It’s available in the Freebookapalooza under Kramer: Sumerian Mythology.

It’s fascinating to me the way that this myth was written. Carved. The original author carved the repetition into stone:

From the “great above” she set her mind toward the “great below,”
The goddess, from the “great above” she set her mind toward the “great below,”
Inanna, from the “great above” she set her mind toward the “great below.”

My lady abandoned heaven, abandoned earth,
     To the nether world she descended,
Inanna abandoned heaven, abandoned earth,
     To the nether world she descended,
Abandoned lordship, abandoned ladyship,
     To the nether world she descended.

Inanna’s Descent to the Nether World

Why do you think the author took the time to chisel each individual line, not quite identical but repetitive in nature?

I think it’s because words have power, and these words in particular are extremely powerful.

This is, after all, the first resurrection story in recorded history.

Bibliography. Inanna’s Descent to the Nether World. Sumerian Mythology by Samuel Noah Kramer.

Featured image: Stone plates upon which Inanna’s Descent was originally carved